Posted on August 28, 2014 By iPledg With 0 comments

Crowd Funding – Bridging the (Medical Benefits) Gap

iPledg - Logo - Low-ResolutionThere has been a lot of noise in the press lately about the government tightening its purse-strings and the effect on public health care as the current fiscal policy contracts. The gap between the amounts that doctors and hospitals charge and the amount that the government will cover is big and getting bigger, with moves being made to further decrease the government’s contribution to health care. But there is an answer, as crowd funding proves to successfully finance medical payments for those really in need.

The first ever successful campaign on iPledg was Help Barry. Barry had cancer and sought to head over to Germany for treatment. His initial goal was to fund the cost of travel, but given the wonderful support he received from family and friends by way of not just pledges but by them spreading the word through social media and email, Barry’s campaign was over funded and saw him well on the way to cover a genostics test to further help with his diagnosis and treatment.

The Rays of sunshine for Ainslie campaign helped Ainslie, who had been diagnosed with a complex brain tumour, travel from Perth to Sydney to meet with renowned brain surgeon Charlie Teo to assess and hopefully operate. With the duration of the visit turning out to be longer than expected, and the cost of accommodation, travel and the expense of the operation being more than expected, friends of Ainslie banded together to crowd fund the costs.  With the funding raised by this campaign falling reasonably short of their initial target, iPledg’s Tipping Point functionality really assisted. The Tipping Point sees the ability for a lower default amount to flow through to the project owner if they hit a much lower (pre-set) target. This unique functionality has helped campaigns on iPledg achieve a higher degree of success, which is particularly important to such health-related campaigns.

Choice for MaiaBrisbane mum, Rebecca, raised money on behalf of her 18 year old daughter, Maia, who  was diagnosed at age 16 with a high grade angiosarcoma of the left breast. She had already had a mastectomy and underwent radiotherapy to the area when, about twelve months later, Maia was diagnosed with secondary angiosarcoma on the lungs. She has multiple sites of cancer on both lungs. She underwent further radiotherapy, and chemotherapy, and is currently receiving a daily oral dose of a new and relatively untested drug which is intended to stop any more cancers from growing, but not impact on the ones which are already there.  Funding was raised for this life prolonging treatment, as opposed to curative measures. This was their only option under the current model of conventional cancer care in Australia. The aim was to raise $6,000 to enable Maia to take advantage of the GENOSTICS diagnostic testing as part of her treatment for terminal cancer. Fortunately, through engagement of a supportive community, family and friends, they achieved more than double their funding target, significantly contributing to her health care

Andrea is a sole parent to a beautiful 10 year old girl. Just when life was looking good, she was diagnosed with stage 3 colorectal cancer. The treatment for this condition includes 7 weeks of chemotherapy and radiotherapy, and then surgery, more before post-op chemotherapy and further operations. The whole process was estimated to require two years, during which Andrea would need to pay for her treatment up front, as Medicare would only partially reimburse expenses once Andrea had paid. Close friends of Andrea ran the campaign- Andrea’s healing journey – which raised $9,000 and helped Andrea bridge these costs.

Funding the gap between government reimbursement and the actual cost of treatment and care is not the only benefit of crowd funding when it comes to this sector. Rehabilitation and recovery, both for the patient and their family can be covered by crowd funding, and this is often as important as the true medical costs themselves. In his book, Will to Live, quadruple amputee Matthew Ames tells of his cancelled plans for the family trip to Disneyland due to what started as a sore throat resulting in the loss of all four of his limbs. He had contracted streptococcal resulting in toxic shock and was never expected to survive. Crowd funding could well offer a vehicle to get patients such as Matthew, his wife and four small children to bond and heal together by allowing them to live out such dreams. All it takes is the will to want to do it, and the committed team of supporters to make it happen.

 

 

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