Posted on March 4, 2016 By iPledg With 0 comments

Crowd Funding – How You Start Determines How You Finish

iPledg - Logo - Low-ResolutionPreparation is the key to successful crowd funding, whether employing the pledge model or capital raising through equity crowd funding. Many experts can quickly assess whether the campaign will reach its goal, just by looking at the campaign and asking the project creator a few simple questions. In most cases, success is determined not by what happens during the campaign, but by the work done in the prelaunch. Research and work done in the lead up to going live will not only give your campaign the best chance of success, but often determine whether the funding goal will be met.

Recently, I stumbled upon perhaps the best template for successful raises that I have ever seen. I am not one to usually promote other sites and businesses related to Crowd Funding, but I can’t sing the praises highly enough for the highly respected Eli Regalado, Chief of Madness at Mad Hatter Agency, who has raised over $1,000,000 and has now put his hints and tips into the Udemy course – “The $400k Crowdfunding Launch Formula” (He obviously wrote the course before raising even more funds!).

His course emphasizes the need for 8 – 12 weeks of preparation prelaunch to really understand the product, the market, and the crowd. “Family And Friends Raises” raise small amounts of money, and rarely even have the audience to do that much. Following Eli’s tips helps to really position yourself well at the starting line of your campaign, so you can cruise to the finish line (OK, there still is a fair amount of work between the start and the finish, but preparation is the key).

The first step is to build your team with specific roles and tasks. Set up a register where you can communicate amongst one another, and have a clear record of what needs to be done by whom, by when, and how. Plan your work and work your plan.

Once your team is in place, start to gain intelligence on the project, the space, and the crowd. Eli gives some great tips on how to “Search like a Ninja” and use simple Google searches in ways far more effective than I ever knew possible (and I thought I was pretty good at searching topics on the ‘net). Searching and researching with tools like www.Netvibes.com will assist in understanding who is talking about your sector and what they are saying.

Identifying and getting on the right side of influencers and advocates will help increase your audience and your bandwith, as well as add considerable clout to your message. It is not enough to find influencers with a few thousand followers – using Eli’s tips will help you find influencers with tens of thousands, if not hundreds of thousands or even millions of followers. “The $400k Crowdfunding Launch Formula” doesn’t only introduce you to tools like www.twitonomy.com but will show you how to use them to engage. From there, you can also get bloggers blogging your message, and turning into advocates for your campaign, way before it even begins. And best of all, you can ask for what you need from well connected, key influencers.

Once your crowd is starting to grow and buzz, you get to the building phase, at which point you start creating content and digital assets. The shortest distance between you and the point of success is not a straight line, but by following the most well worn and successful paths of those who have gone before you.

Then it is a matter of continuing to work your crowd until your campaign goes live. Be authentic in how you choose people and build some rapport first. Take time to do this and your influencers and ambassadors will not only help with your campaign, but they will also help you long term. The beauty of the internet is knowing that if you make a trusted and sincere connection to key influencers and work with them, the reach can be quite extraordinary.

Put quite simply, crowd funding is work – team work! Build your team and work with them. As the founder, drive your vision, but ensure you involve people and listen to them. Build and engage your crowd, and use the experience of those who have done it in the past to build a solid campaign. And remember that the money comes after you build your community. If you don’t, it is like trying to sell Amway on the street corner.

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