Posted on January 30, 2017 By iPledg With 0 comments

Crowd Funding – Providing Schools with an Effective Funding Solution

iPledg - Logo - Low-ResolutionSchool is back in, and now the realisation returns that many schools are in need of more sporting equipment, shade for lunchtime seating, props and scenery for the school play, funding to sending students to participate or compete in an event, and the cash to afford the things to supplement the teaching of the 3 Rs. But with governments’ tightening up on the funding they provide to schools for much required “niceties”, and with traditional funding drives becoming tired and lacking enthusiastic support from the community, crowd funding looms as the fresh and effective solution.

It is wonderfully symbiotic – schools are a great fit for crowd funding, and crowd funding offers a source of funding that requires far less time, effort and risk on the part of the schools. In fact, with a fresh new approach like crowd funding, the engagement level is higher and the appeal far broader than the traditional funding initiatives employed by schools in the past.

There are so many inducements or rewards that are at hand that schools can offer to those who pledge their support. Artwork from the kids, corporate exposure in school newsletter, standard tickets or preferred seating at school plays or sporting events, treats from the school canteen, or recognition through naming rights or mention on an honour board (or even on a simple plaque) are just some of the incentives that schools can offer without being out of pocket. Further engagement with the community can be achieved if some of the parents offer rewards from their businesses to those who support the school’s campaign, thus giving greater inducements to pledge.

There exists a natural audience around schools, a ready-made community from who support can be sought. Parents, students, former students or alumni, local residents, local sporting and special interest groups, and Parents and Friends Associations are all prime candidates to whom schools can easily communicate, and from whom support will be easily forthcoming. With a captive audience, communication to “the crowd” and continually driving the message takes no additional time to the standard day-to-day activities of the school, as informing the crowd is as simple as mentioning the campaign in newsletters, at assemblies, and in the regular forms of constant communication that schools undertake.

Rather than families spending days selling fund-raising chocolates (a practice of which families are growing tired, not to mention the safety issue around sending kids around the neighbourhood, knocking on doors) a crowd funding campaign can be set up in just 10 to 15 minutes, and then maintained and driven with just a few minutes of commitment each day to continually communicate with “the crowd” via social media and email. As such, crowd funding represents a far safer and more efficient alternative to fetes and other fund raising events that require a mountain of effort and which run the risk of lack of turnout or even poor weather.

Crowd funding may just well be the perfect, holistic solution for the funding needs of most schools. Providing the cash they need, as well as a great engagement strategy with the local community, crowd funding will become the sustainable funding solution for schools to use for ongoing, rolling campaigns to fund their needs and aspirations.

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