Posted on February 25, 2016 By iPledg With 0 comments

Crowd Funding – Revisiting the Third Tier Principle

iPledg - Logo - Low-ResolutionThe importance of the Third Tier Principle has long been stressed as the basis on which any crowd funding or capital raising must be based. It is essentially the key to success, with early engagement being the start of broader attention and support. It’s like when we were kids standing on the side of the pool with a group of friends, no one wanted to jump in first. But get a few in the water, and the edge of the pool is no longer the domain of “the cool kids” who will have already jumped in to join their peers.

The third tier principle starts with their first tier – your family and friends, the ones who know and love you. Even your followers, fans, and contacts on social media are considered first tier, as are all of the people in your email folders. In essence, anyone with whom you can have direct communication constitute your first tier. These are the ones you must engage for support for your campaign to be successful. They are the ones who provide early validation for your fund raising or capital raising efforts, and will show others how to follow. Without early engagement, and the support of the first tier, the broader circles of your crowd will be less likely to engage.

The power of the first tier can never be understated, and the ability to engage them early in your efforts to raise broader support is essential to you reaching your funding goal. A study of major crowd funding campaigns around the world showed the importance of priming your crowd early, even before our campaign formally begins, so that you achieve early runs on the board soon after your campaign commences. The study showed that if, in the first 48 hours, you have not raised any funding, your chances of reaching your target was just 15%. However, by reaching just 1% of your funding target within the first 48 hours of your campaign, you almost double your chances of success to 27%. In fact, if you can get to 5% of your target within the first 48 hours, you have a 50% chance of reaching your goal. Should you be able to get to 10% of your funding target in the first two days, then your chances of success increase dramatically to 70% – Achieve 20% and you have an 80% chance of succeeding. And campaigns with 35% of their funding goal met within the first 48 hours meet or exceed their funding target in almost every case.

Having understood the importance of early engagement of your first tier, and the need to build breath of numbers before your campaign commences, your first followers “beckon” to their networks to join them in their actions in following and supporting your campaign. They become your advocates and call to their networks, usually through the use of social media, to do as they have done in pledging their funds to your target. This results in a considerable amplification of your initial efforts. Once this happens, your campaign will start to build a momentum of its own. Crowd funding experts recognise that if a campaign hits 30% of its funding target, it goes on to meet or exceed its target in 90% of cases, and this is due to the momentum created once the second tier engages.

Once you have momentum, the third tier sits up and takes note. Media will also jump on board without prompting. Statistics show that you need to reach 25% of your target before strangers start pledging their support, but once you tap into the third tier, you are now attracting the attention and support of a massive crowd. Referred to as “the smart money”, the third tier is less driven by emotion than the first and second tier, and more about the prospect of what is on offer (although they often are motivated by the fear of missing out).

You Tube sensation, The Shirtless Dancing Guy, is a short video that really captures the essence of the Third Tier principle. It is a clear visual demonstration as to how important it is to gain the support of your first followers, and embrace them. It shows how the first tier instinctively calls on their networks to support and to do as they have done. Without the momentum created by the first two tiers, the third tier, or broader crowd, is less likely to engage. But when the tipping point is reached by the first two tiers, a groundswell is created as the third tier join the movement, and the initiator becomes surrounded by a broad, engaged and supportive crowd.

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