Posted on March 9, 2017 By iPledg With 0 comments

Crowd Funding – the Basics of Capital Raising

iPledg - Logo - Low-ResolutionCapital raising, whether it is by way of equity or by pledge, all starts with a great business or concept. Built it and they will come – as long as “it” is attractive, functional, and relevant. From that, the journey of where you have come from and where you plan to go needs to be cobbled into a good story, and then delivered as a compelling sell to an engaged, supportive and enthused crowd. Get these right, with each of these steps seamlessly integrating into the next, and you have the formula for a successful funding campaign.

Getting the product, service or business model right is like having a solid footing on which to build a house. A less than solid footing may allow you to make some progress, but it will eventually crumble under the weight of scrutiny and market pressure. “Pivoting” – making changes as you develop your concept in response to market feedback and new findings – will allow you to better fashion your concept before you go to market. Doing your homework will ensure you know what the market wants, and that your product, service or company will satisfy or solve that need. Understanding your market allows you to fine tune your concept so that you deliver the market what they want or need, in a way that they can easily uptake your offering. And ensuring you present the pathway forward in a well considered and articulated manner will allow you to take the concept to market.

Once you are confident that you have the right product that people will want, and you are able to demonstrate that your assumptions are substantiated, you will need to start to prepare and build your “crowd”. Start to engage them, not only in your capital raising, but in the product or business itself. Again, if they like what you are doing and you can build enough excitement, you won’t need to ask for investment or pledges – your crowd will be beating down your door to be part of your venture! The internet has made it easy to find like-minded individuals and organisations with whom you can communicate about what you are doing, and to build these followers in to tribes that will not only come on board, but endorse or advocate your efforts, business, and product.

Once you have built your tribe, you need to maintain engagement as well as continue adding to your crowd. Communication is the key. Let them know of your progress. Keep them engaged by telling them of your successes, milestones reached, and the goals you have kicked. Don’t whisper, but shout it from the roof tops and let your crowd hear it. And don’t just talk at them – invite them to get involved and start a conversation. Again, do it publicly so other members of your crowd feel comfortable to get involved, and those outside feel compelled to join in on not just the discussion but to become part of the group.

Your ultimate success is highly dependent on you. 21% of all funding campaigns raise nothing, not a single dollar. This is due the issuer or the project owner failing to engage his first tier or those who know and love them the most. It cannot simply be left for the platform or someone else to bring on funders. Initial momentum for any campaign must be driven by the issue or campaign owner. Before any funding campaign begins, the project creator or issuer needs to have investors or supporters ready to support from the get-go. A movement is created by momentum, and momentum needs to be created early. Many funding campaigns run out of steam because support is too slow in coming. Get supporters and investors on board early, and let the world see they you have something about which they should take note.

Once momentum has begun, keep it going, and recognise there are now a number of priorities to support the main goal of achieving your funding target. You need to motivate your initial supporters or investors to invite their friends and contacts on board, telling them about the great thing they have done in supporting your business, product, or venture. As each of your crowd will have a crowd of their own, this “second tier” represents a much larger audience than you will have reached by yourself. Then there is also the constant task of keeping your total supporter base engaged, as well as growing the number of members of your tribe. Keep your follower numbers growing, keep your tribe focused and involved, and ask your supporters to become advocates for you.

Capital raising in any form involves work – teamwork. You need to sustain energy to maintain focus on building and driving our team towards your funding goal. If your product is largely built to truly satisfy the requirements of the market, and you have done your homework correctly, then you will not have to spend much time on your product as you do your capital raising. Build your immediate followers (your “first tier”) and get some early runs on the board. From there, communicate your successes and ask your first tier to engage their contacts (the second tier). Create noise, momentum, and give people a reason to want to have a look at what you are doing – at your business as well as your capital raising efforts. For the duration of the campaign, never give up, keen going, and remain fast, flexible, and fashionable until your goals are achieved.

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