Posted on December 27, 2015 By iPledg With 0 comments

Crowd Funding – The Discovery Session

iPledg - Logo - Low-ResolutionBefore you start your crowd funding campaign, it is essential to define your target market. Not for your product or service, but to work out who represents the pool of potential supporters who might assist you with your fund raising. Prior to going live with your campaign, you should make a comprehensive list of potential supporters who you can approach, so that the fund raising process starts quickly and accelerates rapidly, attracting the attention of broader and broader networks of supporters. This is known as the Third Tier Principle.

Most crowd funding platforms are there to guide you through the fund raising process, as well as to host your campaign. Whilst their sole purpose is not to attract supporters, they will do this if you start to engage the First Tier, namely those that are closest to you (your friends, family, workmates, etc). Once you have engaged the First Tier, these supporters will start to do some of the work for you, engaging the Second Tier, or “friends of friends”, as the early adopters start to tell their friends what they have done, and inviting them to do the same.

Once the Second Tier starts to support your campaign, you will have established a movement or sufficient momentum for the Third Tier to start to take note. These are a broadest pool of supporters, and what is termed “The Smart Money”. The First Tier supported out of emotional motivation – they know you and love you, but the Third Tier do so out of logical reasoning. They see movement and want to jump on board.

third tier

You need to liken it to the days of your childhood when you stood with your friends at the edge of the swimming pool. Initially, there was the constant elbowing and comments of “you jump in”, to which your friends replied “no, you jump in first”. This continued back and forward until the first, braver few jumped in, then a few more, and then more until it was no longer “cool” to be left standing on the edge.

The same is the case for fund raising. Engage your First Tier. Get them to jump in and then others will follow suit.

To establish your first tier, you should run a Discovery Session to identify who might make up that group.  A Discovery Session simply allows you to make a list of potential candidates for the First Tier so that you have a target group to approach. The broader you make this, the more chance you have of establishing the initial momentum and getting underway to reaching your funding target.

Below are listed some areas to consider when making the list of your potential first supporters:-

  • Family – Ask your family members if they would like to support your campaign. Often family members are reluctant to support because they never really know what they are getting into, but your project description makes it simple, clear and well structured as to what they are supporting.
  • Friends – Same as for your family, ask those who know you and love you the most to consider supporting you.
  • Neighbours – Who are the people that live in your community that ask you with some interest what you are up to? Surely there are people in your local area that may make good potential supporters.
  • Workmates – The clearly defined structure of a crowd funding campaign makes it easy for the people you work with to support you.
  • Clubmates – Are you the member of a sporting club, social club, or a group like Lions or Rotary? Are there members there that you could introduce to your campaign? Remember, you don’t have to directly ask them to support you – if you have set up your project description in a way that is attractive, they will feel compelled to support without you asking. You just need to tell them about what you are doing and invite them to take a look.
  • Social media contacts – Do you have friends on Facebook, Followers on Twitter, or Connections on Linkedin? Prior to a crowd funding campaign, build up your contacts on social media, and once your campaign is live, be sure to invite your connections to have a look at your profile page. Marketing this way is a game of numbers, and the more connections you have on social media, the better chance you will have of reaching your funding target, so be sure to build up your connections before your campaign goes live
  • Interest groups on social media – Not only is it wise to start building up your followers on social media, but start to seek out groups and individuals with an affinity for what your campaign is about. By connecting with likeminded individuals and seeking out groups on social media, you greatly increase your pool of potential supporters. A simple search for search terms associated with your product or service will connect you to a whole new groups of potential supporters.
  • Everyone in your Sent box, Inbox, and Deleted emails – they are all email contacts and a great place to start a database. Everyone who has sent you and email in the past or everyone to whom you have sent an email is captured on your computer. Fish out these email addresses and start to build a list of them (a simple database). You can then email them all about what you are doing with a simple link to your campaign once it is live.
  • Local media – Start to build a list of local media contacts so you can let them know about what you are doing. On the nightly news you will see many of the reporters have their twitter handle (jot them down and send them a direct message). Many of the journalists in the local paper have their email address listed at the end of articles they have written – add them to your database. Contact the local radio stations and tell them about what you are doing. The local media are always on the hunt for interesting local stories, so feed them your news.
  • Blogs – Ever considered writing a blog? It is a great way to get your thoughts out there and engage likeminded people and those interested in your product or service. And if you struggle with writing a blog, you can do a video blog (face to cam) or even use sites to create a cartoon blog to get you message and thoughts out there. As well as creating your own blog, do as we have suggested above and search for blogs related to your product or service, and join them to engage with people who may become potential supporters.
  • Suppliers – Those who supply you, whether it be the components for your product or service, or anything from the cleaning products your use in your business to your stationery supplies, all make potential supporters. They always keen to strengthen ties to their customers, and may make for potential supporters. There is one way to find out – add them to your list and invite them to have a look at your campaign.

Your Discovery Session will have flushed out at least a couple of hundred (if not many more) names of potential supporters who you now need to get on and contact. Start to email, telephone, sms, or visit them and let them know about your campaign. Keep in mind that people will need a couple of reminders during the period of your campaign. Contacting them is not a one-hit-wonder, and the “constant contact” strategy works best, from sending an email a week right up to social media announcements that will need to be made daily.

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